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Watching the Door: Drinking Up, Getting Down, and Cheating Death in 1970s Belfast #2020

Watching the Door Drinking Up Getting Down and Cheating Death in s Belfast Kevin Myers was a young wide eyed and naive outsider thrust into the thick of the conflict in Northern Ireland as it teetered on the brink of civil war Quickly absorbed into the local community and

  • Title: Watching the Door: Drinking Up, Getting Down, and Cheating Death in 1970s Belfast
  • Author: Kevin Myers
  • ISBN: 9781593762353
  • Page: 351
  • Format: Paperback
  • Watching the Door: Drinking Up, Getting Down, and Cheating Death in 1970s Belfast By Kevin Myers, Kevin Myers was a young, wide eyed, and naive outsider thrust into the thick of the conflict in Northern Ireland as it teetered on the brink of civil war Quickly absorbed into the local community and privy to the secrets of both the Protestant and Catholic paramilitaries, Myers gained a unique perspective into both sides of the sectarian violence.Devoid of any political aKevin Myers was a young, wide eyed, and naive outsider thrust into the thick of the conflict in Northern Ireland as it teetered on the brink of civil war Quickly absorbed into the local community and privy to the secrets of both the Protestant and Catholic paramilitaries, Myers gained a unique perspective into both sides of the sectarian violence.Devoid of any political agenda, Myers describes the streets of Belfast at its bloodiest with searing clarity, capturing every inch of the city s disturbing violence Flirting with death at every turn, Myers comes of age as the world around him falls apart, fueled by the psychotic rage, senseless murder, and unrelenting terror that surround Northern Ireland s loyalist gangs, paratroopers, police force, and, of course, average citizen.Part unofficial history, part personal memoir, Watching the Door is raw, provocative, and darkly funny, offering an unbridled account of sex, death, and violence in Northern Ireland by one of its most dynamic witnesses.
    Watching the Door Drinking Up, Getting Down, and Cheating Sep , Part unofficial history, part personal memoir, Watching the Door is raw, provocative, and darkly funny, offering an unbridled account of sex, death, and violence in Northern Ireland by one of its most dynamic witnesses. Review Watching the Door by Kevin Myers Books The Apr , Watching the Door Cheating Death in s Belfast by Kevin Myers pp, Atlantic, . Embarrassed nude female seen naked by kid next door Dec , Embarrassed nude female seen naked by kid from next door Dailymotion For You Explore Do you want to remove all your recent searches All recent searches will be deleted Cancel Remove Log in Watch fullscreen Embarrassed nude female seen naked by kid next door Watch Video Multiple Videos. The Door Study YouTube Mar , This video shows footage from a study by Daniel Simons and Daniel Levin in which a participant fails to notice when the person he is talking to is replaced by someone else. The Door in the Floor Stream and Watch Online The Door in the Floor Stream and Watch Online The lives of Ted Jeff Bridges and Marion Cole Kim Basinger are thrown into disarray when their two adolescent sons die in a car wreck.

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    1 thought on “Watching the Door: Drinking Up, Getting Down, and Cheating Death in 1970s Belfast

    1. This is a book that anyone interested in The Troubles should read Myers, an English born child of Irish parents, goes to Northern Ireland in the early 70 s when he was in his early 20 s He ends up spending than 6 years there, working erratically as a journalist His straightforward accounts of the death and destruction, much of which he witnessed close hand,conveys the horror of the times He is haunted by many of these deaths It is hard to believe he survived countless encounters with paramilita [...]

    2. This is a frank memoir from an Irishman who as a young reporter was sent to Northern Ireland where he was to cover the Troubles There are other aspects to this book but this is what the reader will take away from it Myers met Loyalist terrorists who saw nothing unusual in going fishing with well connected forces of law and order, given that they were friends he met Nationalist terrorists who agreed, sitting in the pub, that execution style killings were deplorable, then sent someone for a gun to [...]

    3. This is a really interesting book Over the years I have read quite a lot about the Northern Irish troubles I was also born and raised in Northern Ireland at the time they were happening so witnessed the tensions and have a fairly good understanding of the politics and mind set that existed at the time something most books go to lengths to try to explain What grabbed my attention with this book was that it didn t seem to be setting out to explain it, but yet managed to do so better than many that [...]

    4. It s been a while since I ve done any reading on what is so euphemistically referred to as The Troubles and I don t think I ve ever read anything substantive on that aspect of Irish history that was not partisan A well written, brutally straightforward account of the author s time as a half assed journalist in Belfast through most of the 1970 s It s a reminder of the casual savagery, the everyday persistent viciousness of the conflict on all sides, including a relentless and very intentional cat [...]

    5. Sex, drugs, and the IRA.Of all the books I ve about the Troubles, this was the most visceral account Imagine if Hunter S Thompson had reported from Belfast in the 70s Kevin Meyers came from an Irish family, but was raised in England In his early 20s, he moved to Belfast to cover the Troubles as a reporter and spent eight dissolute years in the city, drinking with both IRA and Loyalist paramilitaries, covering gun battles and bombings, watching friends murdered, and skirting death Oh, and having [...]

    6. Violent sectarian war between Protestants and Catholics in Ireland was totally baffling to me as a kid I grew up as IRA and UDA partisans were blowing each other and everyone around them to bits in Northern Ireland, and, not knowing the ancient and impenetrable hatreds that self perpetuated and multiplied over the centuries, it struck this American as colossally stupid Two sets of Jesus lovers killing each other ad nauseum and to no real end Turns out that having these hatreds play themselves ou [...]

    7. christ, this book was intense The sheer breadth of experience which Myers reports on is stunning, and that he stayed in Belfast during the Troubles for so long when he was able to get out is surprising Also, the personal attention to the unending and sometimes senseless violence is nearly too much to take The author is an Irish catholic who was brought up as a child in England and then moved back to the Republic to live with family in his pre teen years due to the death of his father, giving him [...]

    8. A brutal, honest and no holds barred memoir of life as a journalist in the bloodstreaked streets of Belfast during the period of what is now known so euphemistically by us as the Troubles Myers has the prose of a hardnosed hack but is unflinching in his recording of the atrocities committed on all sides during the conflict, although I have to say one or two incidents in the book have caused my to raise my eyebrow in disbelief bumping into a Brit army colonel he tangled decades afterwards in whic [...]

    9. I m not typically big on memoirs of misspent youth, but this one got to me Myers does a masterful job of recounting how his personal downward spiral mirrored that of 1970s Belfast, infusing the tale with liberal helpings of both wit and horror The endless parade of senseless killings can be tough to take at times, but Myers eloquent observations about the soul deadening effects of the violence make up for the occasional monotony And I m not too big of a man to confess that I cried at the end.

    10. This book was absolutely phenomenal Hearing about the Troubles in non fiction is one thing, but to hear it through the lens of someone who went it through was amazing Myers was unbiased and honest, quirky, gallant and cowardly He ran the gamut of emotions and experiences proving that all those things you ve already read were true Myers is able to make the story both personal and indifferent I loved this book I ve reread it multiple times Strongly recommend if you like history, Ireland, war or ju [...]

    11. Terrifying and horribly honest I was just a wee bit too young to witness the worst of the troubles, thank god, but Myers captures the delight in tribalism which I can recall all too well.A few reviewers have accused Myers of relying on stereotypes but he doesn t There many, many people, from all communities, in NI, who are, and still are, sadly, just as he portrays them.The one exception is the crude, stupid caricature of the American woman in the later chapters.

    12. You think you have an idea of the terror, fear, dread, and incestuous violence of 1970s Belfast, but you really don t I suspected it was worse than I could summon through my imagination, but I had no idea how, and in what ways You never do, every war is different This memoir is also valuable because of Myers illustration of the impenetrability of that world to any outsider, no matter how long he might hang around You d be a fool to think you understand it You can only take it in.

    13. An excellent introducion for me to this genre It tells of a journalist s view of Belfast towards the start of the Troubles in the early 1970s It is told with honesty and fairness, in a writing style that is easy and again honest but coarse and gritty and unbounded, and contrasts with the dishonesty of the participants Puts a new light on an extended period of aggression and futility.

    14. Fascinating, haunting and very detailed I knew little of the troubles before reading this very personal memoir of those times My overarching view having read this book, is how petty, stupid and dangerous all involved were and how difficult it must have been for ordinary folk to get on with their lives No one comes out of it well and not many come out alive.

    15. This book provides an intimate portrayal of the effect that the Northern Ireland conflict had on individual lives The author provides brutal stories of killings that reflect what the society turned into and how warlords were running the lives of the citizens of Belfast.

    16. Heard about this book first from a Christopher Hitchens book Man, parts harrowing and darkly funny but underscored with the sickening foreboding of the violence that would come to haunt the province for decades to come.

    17. Visceral, honest and moving account of a young gobshite journalist sticking his nose in all sorts of dangerous places in 70s Belfast Some anecdotes have a touch of bravado that suggests exaggeration may occasionally be at work, but the narrative rings true overall.

    18. Excellent story tellerVery readable harrowing tale of the horror of the Ireland situation Pain and hatred Wonderful turn of phrase Shows the butterfly effect of a dew stupid decisions by out of touch British Governors here in 1916 and in almost every conflict they perpetuated

    19. Myers book is an enjoyable and easy read, but I m fairly sure that many of his exploits are exaggerated Reading about how he just slipped away from a loyalist murderer in a pub makes for thrilling reading, but it is far from the only ripping yarn he has to tell.

    20. Quite an interesting and readable account of the life of a journalist in Belfast in the 1970 s Lots of stuff about the killings and general mayhem that Belfast saw during the trouble, also quite a bit about Myers sexual exploits and personal life.

    21. Picked this up in Belfast and read it there I like location based reading Nothing like feeling you re right where the action is unfolding Of course in this case the action is random kidnappings, torture and killings.

    22. Well written, a good read but plays on Irish stereotypes and I felt orients himself to garner positive opinions in the anglophile world, i.e nothing in this that the Daily Telegraph won t like Still worth reading though.

    23. One of the best non fiction books I ve ever read A must for anyone travelling to Belfast for the first time.

    24. Great personal account of the Troubles Really thrilling political stories as well as some hilarious and tragic of life as an Irishman in Belfast.

    25. Much as I loathe Kevin Myers, he really was in the thick of it And this memoir respects the victims as well as casting a disparaging eye on young Myers.

    26. Rubbish Took instant dislike to author who seemed to have a hugely high opinion of himself Was hoping for an insight into troubles but all seemed to be about him Gave up after about chapter 5.

    27. A very interesting account of one man s life during the troubles in 1970 s Belfast Grim, funny and than a little weird I read this in one sitting, it s like watching a car accident happening.

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