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Coercion, Survival, and War: Why Weak States Resist the United States #2020

Coercion Survival and War Why Weak States Resist the United States In asymmetric interstate conflicts great powers have the capability to coerce weak states by threatening their survival but not vice versa It is therefore the great power that decides whether to esca

  • Title: Coercion, Survival, and War: Why Weak States Resist the United States
  • Author: Phil Haun
  • ISBN: 9780804792837
  • Page: 324
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Coercion, Survival, and War: Why Weak States Resist the United States By Phil Haun, In asymmetric interstate conflicts, great powers have the capability to coerce weak states by threatening their survival but not vice versa It is therefore the great power that decides whether to escalate a conflict into a crisis by adopting a coercive strategy.In practice, however, the coercive strategies of the U.S have frequently failed In Coercion, Survival and WarIn asymmetric interstate conflicts, great powers have the capability to coerce weak states by threatening their survival but not vice versa It is therefore the great power that decides whether to escalate a conflict into a crisis by adopting a coercive strategy.In practice, however, the coercive strategies of the U.S have frequently failed In Coercion, Survival and War Phil Haun chronicles 30 asymmetric interstate crises involving the US from 1918 to 2003 The U.S chose coercive strategies in 23 of these cases, but coercion failed half of the time most often because the powerful U.S made demands that threatened the very survival of the weak state, causing it to resist as long as it had the means to do so It is an unfortunate paradox Haun notes that, where the U.S may prefer brute force to coercion, these power asymmetries may well lead it to first attempt coercive strategies that are expected to fail in order to justify the war it desires.He concludes that, when coercion is preferred to brute force there are clear limits as to what can be demanded In such cases, he suggests, U.S policymakers can improve the chances of success by matching appropriate threats to demands, by including other great powers in the coercive process, and by reducing a weak state leader s reputational costs by giving him or her face saving options.
    Coercion, Survival, and War Why Weak States Resist the Coercion failed as Saddam chose to face the ground war with a slim chance of victory rather than concede, which would have threatened the survival of the Iraqi state and his regime This book is about why the United States chooses to coerce weak states and, as with Iraq in , why coercion Coercion, Survival, and War Why Weak States Resist the Jul , Coercion, Survival, and War Why Weak States Resist the United States Kindle edition by Haun, Phil Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Coercion, Survival, and Coercion, Survival, and War Why Weak States Jul , In Coercion, Survival and War Phil Haun chronicles asymmetric interstate crises involving the US from to The U.S chose coercive strategies in of these cases, but coercion failed half of the time most often because the powerful U.S made demands that threatened the very survival Coercion, Survival, and War Why Weak States Resist the In Coercion, Survival and War It is therefore the great power that decides whether to escalate a conflict into a crisis by adopting a coercive strategy In practice, however, the coercive strategies of the U.S. Coercion, Survival, and War Phil Haun In Coercion, Survival and War Phil Haun chronicles asymmetric interstate crises involving the US from to The U.S chose coercive strategies in of these cases, but coercion failed half of the time most often because the powerful U.S made demands that threatened the very survival Coercion, Survival, and War Why Weak States Resist the In Coercion, Survival and War Phil Haun chronicles asymmetric interstate crises involving the US from to The U.S chose coercive strategies in of these cases, but coercion failed half of the time most often because the powerful U.S made demands that threatened the very survival

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      Phil Haun

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